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38 Comment(s) of »Bill Gates Reading List«

Seveneves | 25/10/2016 17:26

read more here: https://www.gatesnotes.com/Books/Seveneves

Stuff Matters | 09/12/2015 11:40

Read more here: http://www.gatesnotes.com/Books/Stuff-Matters

Levinson, M: Box | 29/05/2015 09:41

Read more here: http://www.gatesnotes.com/Books/The-Box

Levinson, M: Box | 29/05/2015 09:40

Read more here: http://www.gatesnotes.com/Books/The-Box

Stress Test | 29/05/2015 09:29

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What If? | 29/05/2015 09:29

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What If? | 29/05/2015 09:29

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Xkcd 0 | 29/05/2015 09:26

Read more here: http://www.gatesnotes.com/Books/XKCD

Gewalt | 03/05/2013 15:20

This was in Bill Gates’ Top Reads in 2012

“People often ask me what is the best book I’ve read in the last year. Steven Pinker’s The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined stands out as one of the most important books I’ve read – not just this year, but ever.” What better recommendation could Gates give ...

The book addresses the role and form of violence in human society through the ages and presents evidence to show how, over time, we are becoming less violent.
It is a long book, at more than 700 pages, and, in Gates’ view, could do with the summary chapter being available separately, but Gates himself clearly states: “As a guy who is pretty rigorous about how he spends his time, I think this book is completely worth the time to read it”.
He concludes: “For me, what’s most important about The Better Angels of Our Nature are its insights into how to help achieve positive outcomes. How can we encourage a less violent, more just society, particularly for the poor? Steven Pinker shows us ways we can make those positive trajectories a little more likely. That’s a contribution, not just to historical scholarship, but to the world.”

Read more here:
http://www.thegatesnotes.com/Books/Personal/The-Better-Angels-of-Our-Nature

The Better Angels of Our Nature | 03/05/2013 15:20

This was in Bill Gates’ Top Reads in 2012

“People often ask me what is the best book I’ve read in the last year. Steven Pinker’s The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined stands out as one of the most important books I’ve read – not just this year, but ever.” What better recommendation could Gates give ...

The book addresses the role and form of violence in human society through the ages and presents evidence to show how, over time, we are becoming less violent.
It is a long book, at more than 700 pages, and, in Gates’ view, could do with the summary chapter being available separately, but Gates himself clearly states: “As a guy who is pretty rigorous about how he spends his time, I think this book is completely worth the time to read it”.
He concludes: “For me, what’s most important about The Better Angels of Our Nature are its insights into how to help achieve positive outcomes. How can we encourage a less violent, more just society, particularly for the poor? Steven Pinker shows us ways we can make those positive trajectories a little more likely. That’s a contribution, not just to historical scholarship, but to the world.”

Read more here:
http://www.thegatesnotes.com/Books/Personal/The-Better-Angels-of-Our-Nature

Deng Xiaoping and the Transformation of China | 03/05/2013 15:18

Gates says: “If you’re going to read one book about modern China in the period after Mao, then this is the book you should read.”

Clearly Deng was a towering figure of the late 20th Century both in China and around the world. This book, ostensibly a biography, uses his life to frame the story of how China went from a desperately poor communist state to a global economic powerhouse.
Gates sees that not just in macro-economic or geo-political terms but also in human terms - “China’s reforms coupled with the tenacity and hard work of its people has improved hundreds of millions of people’s lives in less than a generation. That is more human lives climbing out of poverty post World War II than any other country.”
In a recent New York Times interview, Vogel said, “with this book, I thought I could write something new that would educate Americans about China.” In Gates’ view “I think he absolutely achieves this”.

Read more here:
http://www.thegatesnotes.com/Books/Personal/Deng-Xiaoping

Annawadi oder der Traum von einem anderen Leben | 03/05/2013 15:17

This is a story, which Gates’ compliments saying “it reads like a novel by Dickens”, that addresses head-on the reality of urban poverty which Gates describes as “a uniquely complex and vexing problem—without a quick or simple solution”. He does though say: “It’s also a reminder of the humanity that connects us all”.

Understanding and addressing urban poverty, as witnessed then described in this book by an award winning journalist, is one of the things the Gates Foundation itself works on alongside governments and aid agencies. Gates himself visits these places while he continues “to look for ways we can help improve the lives of the poorest”. So he is well qualified to judge this book as “an unvarnished, first-hand account of life in one of India’s slums”.
He says: “So it’s a sad story and it makes you want to help. It reminds us how much more work needs to be done to address the inequities in the world. But it’s also uplifting at times because Boo shows people striving to make a life for themselves, sacrificing for their families, and in their own way, being innovative and entrepreneurial in creating a vibrant local economy.”

Read more here:
http://www.thegatesnotes.com/Books/Development/Behind-the-Beautiful-Forevers-Life-Death-and-Hope-in-a-Mumbai-Undercity

QUEST | 03/05/2013 15:16

“It’s a fantastic book I highly recommend to anyone who is interested in energy” says Gates, describing it as “a valuable guide to the complex factors shaping the world’s energy needs, supplies and prices”.

Energy is one of the critical factors shaping our future not least as an engine of global political and economic change and conflict. This book gives a thorough and comprehensive insight, as well as appreciation of the issues, which in Gates’ view “should leave us all at least slightly optimistic”.
Gate’s only reservation is its length, which, at 816 pages he describes as a “commitment”, not least because the sheer wealth of information and data included in the book, however he does balance that with the comment that: “it’s a fast read because Yergin relays information through stories that are very well told”.
He concludes: “His book is a real contribution to a debate that deserves far more attention”.

Read more here:
http://www.thegatesnotes.com/Books/Energy/The-Quest

Moonwalking with Einstein | 03/05/2013 15:15

“It’s absolutely phenomenal, one of the most interesting books I’ve read this summer” says Gates.

The sub-title of the book is “The Art and Science of Remembering Everything” and, to quote the publisher, “Foer's unlikely journey from chronically forgetful science journalist to U.S. Memory Champion frames a revelatory exploration of the vast, hidden impact of memory on every aspect of our lives.”
Like a lot of people Gates is fascinated by how the mind works, and he says: “Part of the beauty of this book is that it makes clear how memory and understanding are not two different things.”
Another, powerful, conclusion that Gates draws is: “The book reminds us that we all start off with pretty much the same tools for the most part, and we can be intentional about strengthening them, or not.”

Read more here:
http://www.thegatesnotes.com/Books/Personal/Moonwalking-with-Einstein

Why Nations Fail | 03/05/2013 15:14

The subtitle of this book is “The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty” and it addresses why some countries have prospered and created great living conditions for their citizens while others have not.

Gates is very clear: “This is an important topic, which I care a lot about.”

However he has both praise and criticism for the book, on the one hand saying “It is well written and very easy to read with lots of interesting historical stories about different countries” yet on the other complaining that “It is a major disappointment. Its analysis is vague and simplistic.”
What appears to attract Gates, though, is that it makes that argument that “economic development depends on political institutions that protect individual rights” which may well be why he recommended it.

Read more here:
http://www.thegatesnotes.com/Books/Personal/Why-Nations-Fail

Tapdancing to Work | 03/05/2013 15:12

In Bill Gates’ view: “It's very, very good.”

In fact it is a collection of writings about Warren Buffet.

Gates comments: “I think anyone who reads it cover to cover will come away with two reactions: First, how Warren’s been incredibly consistent in applying his vision and investment principles over the duration of his career; and, secondly, that his analysis and understanding of business and markets remains unparalleled.”
In Gates’ view Buffet is a “genius” with astounding intellect and business insight.
What higher praise than when Bill writes: “Examining the arc of Warren’s business life in his own words and those of other gifted observers (preeminently, Carol Loomis, herself) is an extremely worthwhile use of time - to get into the mind of this remarkable business leader and philanthropist.”

Read more here:
http://www.thegatesnotes.com/Books/Personal/Tap-Dancing-to-Work

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